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English 38
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the crowd in new york city on new year's eve. >>> a fatal plane crash in russia, the impact sending debris flying into oncoming traffic. >>> a scary slip on a frozen lake in the moun tapetains of southern california became a race to save a life. >>> and kim carkardashian is pregnant. >>> intercepted by rob jackson. redskins into the playoffs. rg3. maybe he can solve the fiscal cliff. >>> and all that matters. >> fireworks lit up sydney harbor, beautiful, as people mark the start of 2013. happy new year. >> on "cbs this morning." >>> chuck pagano back on the colts sideline yesterday cancer free as the colts won 28-16. >> i feel so blessed to be back with you guys in the battle. thank you. thank you so much. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." i'm norah o'donnell with anthony mason. as we wake up the deadline to the fiscal cliff is just 14 hours ai wa. there's no deal yet, but members of congress are heading back to capitol hill. first, breaking news on the condition of secretary of state hillary clinton. >> she's in a new york city hospital
from york and new jersey urged congress to approve a supplemental funding for its cities affected by hurricane cindy. two officials with the small business administration testified. this is one hour and 45 minutes. >> good morning. thank you for joining us today to discuss the small business administration's response to hurricane sandy. i've of like to thank our witnesses that will be testifying in just a moment. i will introduce them in just a moment. let me make a couple of opening statements. we are here today to evaluate the response and recovery effort in the aftermath of hurricane same day as the largest ice storm in u.s. history. hurricane zandi claimed the lives of 130 to americans, it damaging and destroying more than 600,000 homes and 459,000 businesses leaving more than 8.5 million families with out fire or running water. most of the power grid has been turned back on. they're still communities that are challenged. the scale has treated significant challenges. this a require a sustained effort a part of the local officials. voluntary earlier this week i had the chance t
their control towers. jobs and revenue that may never come back. john bentley, cbs news, new york. >> winter storms are spreading across the country, a massive storm that created havoc east of the mississippi is now headed to new england. that storm left a trail of power outages in the southeast after dumping some 15 inches of snow. in california, heavy snows continue to pile up. but inside the storm clouds there is a silver lining, as carter evans reports. >> reporter: snow fell again today in california's mountains. the latest in a string of storms that could have a major effect on the state's drought. >> if this trend top storys we'll be looking at excess water, rather than a water shortage. >> reporter: this san francisco meteorologist says the mounting snow pack, already 146% higher than normal, means the state's reservoirs will be in good supply. >> almost like putting water in a bank and then saving it for summertime where we get virtually no rainfalls. >> my gut feeling is this will be a good year for us. >> reporter: he's a water manager in southern california, where part of l. a.'s
in close touch and follow this. thank you. >>> in new york, police have a woman in custody in connection with a case of the man pushed to his death from a subway platform in that city. police had targeted a woman who looked like this police sketch, a heavy set woman in her 20s caught on a security camera running away after that attack on thursday. david aristo is live in new york with the latest developments on this, and pretty quick work here, wasn't it? >> seems to be. they have this woman in custody right now because that she had implicated herself, the statement we got from chief of police department spokesman paul brown. and this is a case that certainly has rocked new york. this is the second time this has taken place within the month of december. it's something that doesn't happen all that often here in new york. 8.5 million people in the city and many, many people take the subway. so to have something like this take place, you would think it's got the city in sort of a tizzy. this thing happened in queens. the woman was walking back and forth. it's not clear if the one that they
. as we zoom into the radar you see heavy snow. into the southern tier of new york moving into buffalo. what's going to happen with this system is the main low is going to transfer its energy to the coast and that is going to become the primary storm that's going to rise up the eastern seaboard and probably pretty significant places below. but even the major i-95 cities like new york, philly and boston will see significant snow from this. >> what happens here? how much worse is it here than in the rest of the country? >> well, you know, this storm was fairly weak before nowhere near as strong as the last one was. this is finally getting its act together. >> get our shovels and boots out? that's the idea? >> yeah. and as far as the snowfall totals we're expecting to see, probably the major cities could get in on the action. that's how different it was from the last system. so new york city three, four, five inches of snow not out of the question. upstate new york especially where it's a little colder, but as we head toward southeastern new england, that's where t
guardia airport here in new york. julie, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, kate. well, another winter storm for thousands of travelers making their way home from the christmas holiday to ring in the new year. today a winter storm moved quickly northeast dumping snow from the ohio valley up through parts of new england. the storm did not bring with it blockbuster snowfall but it was a quick hitter that came down hard and fast, forcing some commuters to get creative. >> by ski and then by bus later. >> reporter: stranding others. >> once the snow starts, until the plows come by, you're pretty much stuck. >> reporter: the low visibility on highways caused several car accidents and prompted road closures in new york and pennsylvania. creating problems for more than 20 million people traveling between christmas and new year's. the weather channel's mike seidel was in harrisburg this afternoon. >> reporter: for many in pennsylvania this is the third time they had to shovel snow this week, some picking up another 4 to 6 inches. over in philadelphia everyone for the first time in the season got a c
is this being -- is being hospitalized in new york city. doctors discovered a blood clot during a follow-up exam. the 65-year-old was diagnosed with a concussion after fainting earlier this month. staffers said clinton got dehydrated because of a stomach virus. she is expecting to remain at new york's presbyterian hospital for at least a couple of days so doctors can treat the clots with drugs and monitor her condition. >>> we are 1 hours away from going over the fiscal cliff. lawmakers went home last night without reaching an agreement. harry reid expects to reconvene the senate around 11:00 this morning. he is not giving up on reaching a last minute deal. >> there is still significant distance between the two sides. but negotiations continue. >> reporter: a lot of give and take is going on right now. republicans don't want to see new revenues, in other words democrat tax increases be used for new spending. >>> on meet the press president obama accused republicans of protecting the wealthiest americans from tax hikes. >> reporter: the president has asked his plan, which includes tax hikes, to b
to the rule, the gentlewoman from florida, ms. ros-lehtinen, and the gentleman from new york, mr. engel, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentlewoman from florida. ms. ros-lehtinen: i thank the speaker, and i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and to insert extraneous materials into the record on this measure. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. ros-lehtinen: i thank the speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman is recognized for as much time as she wishes to consume. ms. ros-lehtinen: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise in strong support of house resolution 134, introduced by my good friend and colleague from illinois, mr. dold. house resolution 134 condemns the iranian regime's persecution of iran's baha'i minority. baha'i are the largest non-muslim population in iran, numbering over 300,000 members in iran alone. mr. speaker, this resolution marks the 12th congressional action urging the iranian regime to end its persecution of the baha
expect, new york, london and frankfurt and tokyo within interesting outlier and the outliers were a lot of my story places like ashburn virginia in unincorporated suburb where if you ask internet people in the network engineers that i spent a lot of time with what are the capitals of the internet they would say new york london los angeles and ashford. those are the places, the short list of places that are by far the hotspots, super nose on the global internet. >> host: would have the super nose look like mr. blum when you look at them? >> guest: from the outside they look a bit like you might say the loading dock of a shopping mall. there are quite generic from the outside. they try to hide in plain sight as you are driving by them. some of them are art deco buildings that used to belong to western western union or telecom palaces. others are kind of from operators like to call it cyber stickler, cyber stick an adjective of choice meaning they kind of look like they are science science-fiction and that is deliberate. they are sort of modeled after science-fiction in order to appeal to
leader harry reid in the "new york times, returning to the u.s. capitol. his shadow. what's the relationship between harry reid and mitch mcconnell? guest: it's hard to tell. the rhetoric on the senate floor can be pretty tough. they call each other my dear friend whenever you want them on the c-span channels, but i think they both are in a frustrating position. senator harry reid does not have more than 60 members, so we cannot block a filibuster but senator mcconnell is adept at applying in cases where he'd want to block legislation. but i think they both have respect for each other's legislative skills and they have proven in the past that when they need to cut a deal, but can cut a deal and bring their party's members with them. host: john mccain writes a big budget deal is still worth doing. he points out to the history of some of these agreements, most notably with ronald reagan in the 1980's and president bush in 1991 in which republicans agreed to spending cuts that never happened while raising taxes. guest: that's right. there's a little confusion about how much s
and they will run the republicans out. host: here's a headline from the new york post. i want to read you a little bit on that subject from the new york times. that is from the new york times today. stephen from indiana is next on our independent line. good morning. caller: good morning. i will tell you, these breaks did not help when they started in. 2000 or in. how come is a point to hurt so bad when they removed them? we are talking $10 or $20 a week. everybody acts like it's thousands of dollars. so much money can help everybody out. itlet it expire. we have debts from the two wars and that's why we are in debt. that's my opinion. thank you. on twitter -- on wall street journal article. you can read more that in today's wall street journal. i want to bring in jim from franklin, tennessee, on the republican line. caller: thank you. i appreciate your taking my call today. i have been listening very closely to c-span for a long time. i particularly listen to what the democrats are saying, because i am always trying to figure out what they want. i boiled it down to four things. they want to tax mo
the history of new york city, albany. next, a discussion on the impact of the so-called fiscal cliff on unemployment insurance. then a forum on skilled immigrant labor and the american economy. after that, speaker john boehner and representative pelosi on the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine, but we have not coordinated care and all of the services that we have end up having cracks that they are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. you need to step back and ask -- are we hurting people overall on a global level? what are we doing sometimes? now we have the institute of medicine report to think. 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in healthcare? 30% of the medications that we describe? the procedures? this is something that is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. healthcare industry. dr. marty makary on his book " unaccountable." on c-span 2. >> it is estimated that it would cost -- [indiscernible] [bells ringing] >> i chose to honor both. the sacrifice of american se
in new york city. [applause]. well for the past few weeks, i've traveled to about 48 city signing dear chandler, dear scarlet and i met several thousand who watched the show every week, it's.that americans are-- and many of you are wondering if your kids and grandkids are going to have a better life than you. and what i heard over and over our leaders aren't leading and the election didn't send a clear message, the song of the hugh once said, meet the new boss, same as the old boss pt sate president, same senate and same house. we may have barely moved the chairs around on the deck of the sinking "titanic," but maybe we're putting faith in human beings,no getter at serving. >> and you pay your bills and show up for work. washington s to borrow from the chinese to pay its bill and barely shows any real work. it occurred if they won't listen to us, i wonder if they'd listen to a stronger voice, if he'd speak with burning bush, and part it seems likes he knows how get through. since neither party seems to listen to us, what would happen if god asked them to speak to him ap listen to him.
house would be burn down. the tea boycott spread to other cities, down the coast to new york, philadelphia, charleston, and other ports. this was the original tea party movement. it was not patriotic. it was not pretty or glorious. the furry climaxed thursday, december 16th, 1773, just before kris christmas, and the dumping of a million dollars worth of british tea. the people who dumped them amounted to about six or seven dozen men, nobody knows exactly how many were there. it was dark. many disguised themselves as indians. ironically, the white colonist who slaughtered indians on site, disguised themselves as indians baa they regarded them as a symbol of freedom. this unleashed a social, political, and economic upheaval they would never again be able to control. the tea party provoked a reign of terror in boston and other american cities with american inflicting unimaginable bar bareties on each other. they dumped ships, boston staged a second tea party a few months after the first one. the mobs showed no dissent, burning homes of anyone they suspected of favoring british r
americans, haitians, a big lgbt community, big arts community, a lot of internal migrants from new york, where the same way clark county has been -- you've got a pot, a core of white democratic activists that have brought california politics in nevada. ofmiami, you've got a core new york, northeastern democratic activists who brought those politics to south florida. and within that you're now starting to see very effective latino players, a democratic congressman who won a race against a highly flawed republican candidate, but still won, who formed a coalition that, you know, went from miami beach through working class neighborhoods, all the way down to the keys with very distinct different working class whites, gays, you know, snowbirders, and then a big chunk of cuban and non-cuban latinos. so, in the second part of it, you start thinking about identity politics in a different way. if you are thinking of a group that has flexed its muscles by virtue of being part of a coalition, as opposed to having flexed its muscles as being a plaintiff, as having been alone, as being outsiders sayi
monday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." we are live from the new york stock exchange. let's take a look at the u.s. futures set up for the open first of the week. dow looking at about 50 points right after the open. as for the action in europe, taking its cues from the united states. we'll see a big rally in china extending one of its biggest rallies in three years. we have a mixed bag in europe with italy up by about .2 of 1%. >> we'll do our best to keep focused on the business day. we'll be following the tragic shooting in connecticut, of course. the new york stock exchange will hold a moment of silence to honor the victims in the next few moments, and we'll be looking at the president's call for meaningful action and the politics of gun control. >> let's get to a road map for this morning. it starts with apple. under pressure once again. even dipping below $500 a share at some point this morning. shares will remain range bound near term. iphone 5 sales and cannibalization among the region. >> other concessions from the gop, the speaker proposing tax hikes for millionai
this columnist for "the new york times" is brilliant in writing. he's a great, great journalist and explains things so well. i really have great admiration for him. he wrote yesterday, "republicans have to realize they are going to have to cave in on tax rates." that's the way it is, mr. president. "they're going to have to cave on tax rates." then on tuesday, day before yesterday, the senior senator from maine, olympia snowe, urged house republican leaders to end the suspense for middle-class taxpayers. "they shouldn't have to wonder whether we will ultimately raise taxes on low- to middle-income people." i assure them we won't raise taxes on the middle class on the poor, is what ow olympia snowe said. yesterday it seemed every practical republican left in washington was suddenly willing to say out loud what we have known for weeks: the only remaining option is for the house to pass the senate bill. dozens of house republicans signed onto a letter urging speaker boehner to take the last hexit before the cliff. neither president obama nor democrats in congress have ever been ambiguous about
. if you are in new york city, schoolteachers and firemen make $100,000 a year and they are easily in households the approach the limit. it depends and where you live. among high-income people, there is a wide range of what people pay in taxes. if you're a lawyer in washington, i find them to be reasonable people who work long hours. you are probably paying 28%. if you are on wall street and you are well-connected if you have a capacity to have your income defined as investment as opposed to salary even though it is indeed salary income. if you are somebody like jamie dimon or warren buffet, you can get away with 14% tax. the real problem with upper individuals are not the people who pay the taxes we intend for the to pay, but all the people who get away without paying any taxes at all. those tax breaks and write offs are derived by the president and by democrats, but they never seem to get fixed. one reason is republicans do not want them fixed. and the other hand, the democrats get a lot of campaign contributions from wall street. that is a real problem on both sides of the aisle
, there was a bankrupt factory in upstate new york. an immigrant bought it. he said i will figure out some way to use it. seven years later, he created a company that has hired 1500 employees and will do $1 billion of sales. it is the number one yogurt brand. seven years ago, it was a bankrupt factory in upstate new york. the impact more broadly is pretty significant. >> you talk about how countries around the world are trying to copy that secret sauce of america's innovative society. do any of you see any indication that the united states' appeal, from its great research universities or to people who want to start companies, that the united states has lost any of this appeal? >> absolutely. the university may be different, but as it relates to the entrepreneur ship and creating companies, absolutely. that is not to say that we do not have a lot of things going for us. to suggest that there is not robust entrepreneurial ecosystem developing in many different countries is just not accurate. one fact that should be scary is that there is a venture firm, xcel partners, that back facebook -- all of their ve
because the technology changed. there is a magnetic tape. you have to go to chicago or new york to record. i'm an old-fashioned guy. i still want all those kids to come to a seminar on a campus. i am teaching a course next year and i'm trying to figure how to get my 50-minute chunks -- 15-minute chunks. we have a question there. >> i'm carol thompson. i have a question for each of the three panelists. we have been talking about what we were hoping for the future. what are your greatest fears and greatest hopes for 2016 and 2020? it is a small question. >> i presume you don't think the world will end december 21. >> susan will not say newt gingrich will run again. >> did not come to me first on this one. >> wow, my greatest fear? i hope my kids are well employed. they are doing ok. they are in their 20's. my greatest fear -- i do not think about fears. i'm surrounded by so many incredible kids that i feel good. if i feel bad in the morning, i feel good after my class. >> you stole my thunder. >> i prefer the thunder over the heat. >> a couple of things. i think the fiscal situation is the
that passes and changes the public opinion of gun ownership? >> if we can ban super sized soda in new york city, i think we can do this. >> i do have a cynicism in me that says, you know, if we lose momentum we're going to be footnoted to the next horrible tragedy that unfolds. a month from now, two months from now. i hate that feeling. it's really cynical and a horrible thing to think. but it seems like that's sort of been the pattern over the last several years. >> i support responsible gun ownership. i've gone to firing ranges. i've fired guns. i don't own a gun. i would be happy to listen to responsible gun owners as well. i don't support banning all guns. just weapons that can just keech shooting and shooting and shooting. >> and i feel the same way. i grew up learning to shoot with my father. it's one of the few things we did together. >> the fact is we need to start enforcing laws we have. we need to make stronger laws. particularly regarding these high-powered weapons. that are brutally efficient at killing people. because there's no need for civilians to have those. i don't think
in the "new york times," and the tax policy institute, which is certainly not a right of center institution, i think it would be slightly left of center, at least center -- if you cap deductions at $50,000 it generates $750 billion over 10 years. if you do the chain cpi, which i think mark has embraced. >> do you include charitables in that camp? >> you can include charitables, or you can also look at the health-care exclusion, which by the way is the most massive that exists. i do not know why people in the income categories that mark and i are in and now tim with his big budget job -- i do not know. >> bob, i hate to tell you, he is in a higher category than you. [laughter] >> they will publish that soon, i am sure. i do not know why we should continue to have the benefit of our health care plans coming to us in a tax-free way. there are all kinds of ways of looking at it. i do realize that to do real tax reform takes time, but i think we could go ahead and do some things. for instance, the $50,000 exclusion -- i realize that has been a non starter so far. i actually think we will end up wit
piece in "the new york times" i think at the beginning of last week for the week before about the next genocide being against allowites, and that fear is present among the community members and so what you are talking about is just an extension of that and the way around it is the political solution the longer the violence goes on, the more extremist groups benefit and based on what we have seen of no sort of parent organization, al qaeda and iraqi will not be merciful at all so it is incumbent on us to bolster what in the political opposition which is what we are trying to do. >> thank you, ambassador woo-hoo when you say the regime is numbered is that proverbial or do you mean days? and more broad, as you pointed out at the outset, the then studied peacefully but later on we saw international forces get involved and the europeans and the gulf arabs what mechanisms do you foresee for the future of serious of the interest of the syrian people do not get overwhelmed by the interest of these outside forces. the direction of the events on the ground, the direction is very clear when the d
is a popular option. take it to new york or philadelphia could cost you just $1 or $20. an app. can help you know if you're traveling safety. if the administration created the app. to check the safety reports of any bus companies. there were several deadly crashes, including this one in virginia last year. safety is important on board and before you even get on the bus. >> we would encourage -- is it an easily acceterminal. discount bus travel has become extremely popular nationwide. there are 750 million trips on those buses every year. >>> dan is out there with chris cooley, who's got to be feeling chipper and cheery today after, what, a five-game winning streak? >> first time since 2007. talking about the two quarterbacks and the defense and anything else you want to talk about. >> whatever. i think it was 2005. we only won four in 2007. an athlete. my goodness. "the cooley report" after this. >>> hello, everybody. i'm meteorologist doug kammerer live at the national zoo for zoo lights which goes on between now and the first of the year. they'll be open ever night 5:00 to 9:00 with the ex
sides plan to meet in new york tomorrow. >> tonight the warriors play their final game of the year when they host the boston celtics. the warriors are now 20-10 with their win last night. this is the first time they have had 20 wins before new year's day since 1980. david lee finished with 25 points and 12 rebounds, their first game will be on wednesday against the hottest team in the nba, the clippers. >> should be a good one. the healthiest places for men to live. . >> morning showers are tapering off leaving us a dry, cool afternoon. i will have the numbers for you coming up. . >>> highway one is back open this morning after a rock slide closed the highway for almost a week. a emergency contractor was called into repair a 60-foot section of the highway. officials are urging drivers to use caution when traveling because of rough pavement and loose gravel. >> i'm thinking about taking a jog today. >> jog? >> i tonight do it often. more of a hiker, kind of a walker. if i go out, bring the jacket i guess. >> i like it to be a little warmer. >> yeah. you know some like it cool when
, a state like new york or california has a lot more poor people. and it also has a lot of rich people. it doesn't get the same break. i think you get 60% or over 60% reimbursement from the feds. you get 50%. you get -- i think it's you. get 60%. i can't remember everybody's numbers. i tried to educate myself. and in new york, we only get 50%. it makes a big difference. pam moynihan who always tried to change those formulas, ended up sake it's all james madison's fault. >> and we appreciate -- >> i think there are a couple of things that are terribly, terribly important and don't contradict anything that you all said. but we don't have a very good way of measuring the adequacy of our infrastructure. we know that the chinese spend eight times as high of percentage of their g.d.p. in infrastructure as we do in this country. and we know that that's got to make us less competitive. and i think i learned from the people at the chamber here that the cost of moving goods in the united states is greater in absolute dollars than it is in europe or in asia. and i don't know personally how you gr
with two men who know all about guns. lou palombo, a former police officer and director of new york based security firm, and here with me in studio, tom deitz, a former atlanta area police officer. he now owns a gun shop and a shooting range, and i'm looking to both of you guys, you both have a strong and unique perspective here. so what kind of deal, what kind of deal will be acceptable to people who balk at gun control or limiting rights? first the president said to joe biden just this week, you have until january, give us your best recommendations how to stop these mass shootings. this past week democrat senator dianne feinstein told our piers morgan exactly what she wants. >> this is the straw that breaks the camel's back. people have to respond. they have to understand that the rights for many to remain safe are more important than any right you may think you have to have a military-style assault weapon. >> okay. so you heard her. so tom, you've been a cop. not just a gun owner. you own a gun store. so this goes beyond that for you. what's your reaction to the senator's words? >> wel
of new york based security firm, and here with me in studio, tom deitz, a former atlanta area police officer. he now owns a gun shop and a shooting range, and i'm looking to both of you guys, you both have a strong and unique perspective here. so what kind of deal, what kind of deal will be acceptable to people who balk at gun control or limiting rights? first the president said to joe biden just this week, you have until january, give us your best recommendations how to stop these mass shootings. this past week democrat senator dianne feinstein told our piers morgan exactly what she wants. >> this is the straw that breaks the camel's back. people have to respond. 23 they have to understand that the rights for many to remain safe are are month important than any right you may think you have to have a military-style assault weapon. >> okay. so you heard her. sir tom, you've been a top. yot just a gun owner. you own a gun store. so this goes beyond that for you. what's your reaction to the senator's words? >> well, i don't think that the assault weapons ban or propose the assault weapo
scenes at the history of new york capital city, albany saturday at noon eastern on book tv and on c-span2 >> house r house speaker told reporters the white house has wasted another week on negotiations over the fiscal cliff. >> this isn't a progress report because there is no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that is threatening our economy and jobs the white house has wasted another week. secretary geithner came here to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes that the president campaigned on and had more stimulus spending than in cuts. and an indefinite increase in the debt limit like for ever. now four days ago we offered a serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then there has been no count offer from the white house. instead reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, un
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)